Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

Secondhand shopping was something that was always frowned upon when I was growing up. Despite being raised within a working class family and accepting hand-me-downs on the sly, I grew up in the heart of a wealthy area of Essex where fellow teens were casually sporting the latest Burberry quilted jacket and Louis Vuitton bag, and the idea of shopping in charity shops or car boot sales were seen to be unacceptable. It wasn't until I moved away for university and started really managing my own budget that I started shopping secondhand regularly and found a love for it, especially with the huge vintage revival which suited my yearning for anything from the 60s and 70s perfectly.

Shopping used items nowadays and trawling through charity shops is no where near as looked down upon thanks to vintage becoming 'cool' and covetable again. Although it's starting to die down a little bit away from mainstream trends now, it still influences them tremendously. I've pieced together a little reminder as to why switching our shopping to vintage and secondhand shouldn't be forgotten anytime soon.


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger
Hat: Catarzi x ASOS
Bag: Mango
Boots*: Kurt Geiger

Save yourself some cash

It goes without saying that if you start swapping your usual shopping habits and open yourself up to shopping secondhand, you're likely to save yourself some dosh. Your bank balance will feel a bigger and more positive impact if you secondhand shop in charity shops and car boots sales. Whilst some vintage shops can be cheaper than shopping on the high street, charity shops are considerably cheaper with items ranging on average between £2 - £6 each dependent on the charity shop and the item. Some charity shops are more expensive than others, but it's just a case of exploring your local ones and learning the average cost price across them all.

Car boot sales are even cheaper than charity shops and over the year I've managed to pick up some incredible vintage pieces for as little as 30p per item! You absolutely have to be prepared to rummage through a lot of junk, but it's worth it for some of the treasures you find at the end of it! Understandably I understand spending hours searching through a pile of rubbish isn't for everyone, but I absolutely thrive on it. Don't knock it until you've tried it!


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger
Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

You'll find items that are unique and no one else has

There's nothing quite like the satisfaction of someone asking you where you got your new dress from and replying in a smug tone, "Oh it's vintage, darling!", and smirking knowing they'll never find a replica... or maybe that's just me being particularly evil?! 

This is especially the case when shopping vintage and finding more antique style pieces that aren't currently being mass-produced, meaning it's less likely someone else will have an exact replica of it. High street fashion can become a little stale when everyone starts wearing the same pair of studded ankle boots or floral printed dress, but adding a touch of vintage into your wardrobe is actually a little more refreshing despite the garments usually being older than you are! There's also a certain charm about an item of clothing having another life and story before it came into your possession, particularly if its history dates back to another decade. 


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

Save the planet as well as your wallet

An absolutely horrifying amount of clothing fills up our limited landfills across the globe. According to a study, this year Britons will send up 235 million items of clothing to landfills in one season alone. The rise of 'fast fashion' and cheap high street retailers means consumers are more likely to purchase disposable garments, which are thrown away within a few months filling up the limited and valuable space we have left. Recycling unwanted items by donating them to charity, customising them or mending them can help reduce the amount of unnecessary clothing going towards landfills. By opening up your spending habits to shopping secondhand, you'll naturally be reducing the demand for new goods, which wreak havoc on the environment during mass production.

Purchasing used goods also helps towards saving the excessive energy used and pollution created via transporting brand new goods. Of course, there are still some carbon emissions in the transportation of used items travelling to the charity shop, post office or vintage store, but it's significantly lower than the mass-produced pieces being flown around the world from huge factories. Thrift shopping naturally results in a significantly lower carbon footprint and it's an easy change to make. Another positive point is that by shopping second you'll also saves on packaging waste, which accompanies buying new goods in the form of plastic, tags, cardboard, etc. 

You'll end up with new exciting things that you didn't plan for

When we shop on the high street, we always go out with a rough idea of what we're looking for. However, when shopping secondhand it's mostly a game of chance and seeing what you discover! I personally find this exciting and I've returned home with items I'd never even imagined before but absolutely fell in love with when I saw it in the shop. It's a good way to become a little more adventurous with your style as you can't curate it and plan it as well beforehand, whereas the high street where everywhere usually has roughly the same set of trends during any given time.

However, if you do like the idea of knowing exactly what you want, but still want to save some cash and lower your consumer carbon footprint, then you can use websites such as eBay or Depop to search for specific items for a fraction of the retail price. I use them both religiously to hunt for particular high street goods that have caught my eye. 

Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

By making a few small changes to your shopping routine here and there will start to make a difference on your personal style, your savings and your impact on the planet. Despite being an advocate for secondhand shopping, I still shop on the high street but it's still significantly less than my shopping amongst vintage and charity shops. Basically you don't have to cut out your trips to your fave high street shop every so often, but by reducing them and replacing them with an secondhand alternative you'll be doing yourself a favour, as well as the environment.


BLOGLOVIN' | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

Secondhand shopping was something that was always frowned upon when I was growing up. Despite being raised within a working class family and accepting hand-me-downs on the sly, I grew up in the heart of a wealthy area of Essex where fellow teens were casually sporting the latest Burberry quilted jacket and Louis Vuitton bag, and the idea of shopping in charity shops or car boot sales were seen to be unacceptable. It wasn't until I moved away for university and started really managing my own budget that I started shopping secondhand regularly and found a love for it, especially with the huge vintage revival which suited my yearning for anything from the 60s and 70s perfectly.

Shopping used items nowadays and trawling through charity shops is no where near as looked down upon thanks to vintage becoming 'cool' and covetable again. Although it's starting to die down a little bit away from mainstream trends now, it still influences them tremendously. I've pieced together a little reminder as to why switching our shopping to vintage and secondhand shouldn't be forgotten anytime soon.


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger
Hat: Catarzi x ASOS
Bag: Mango
Boots*: Kurt Geiger

Save yourself some cash

It goes without saying that if you start swapping your usual shopping habits and open yourself up to shopping secondhand, you're likely to save yourself some dosh. Your bank balance will feel a bigger and more positive impact if you secondhand shop in charity shops and car boots sales. Whilst some vintage shops can be cheaper than shopping on the high street, charity shops are considerably cheaper with items ranging on average between £2 - £6 each dependent on the charity shop and the item. Some charity shops are more expensive than others, but it's just a case of exploring your local ones and learning the average cost price across them all.

Car boot sales are even cheaper than charity shops and over the year I've managed to pick up some incredible vintage pieces for as little as 30p per item! You absolutely have to be prepared to rummage through a lot of junk, but it's worth it for some of the treasures you find at the end of it! Understandably I understand spending hours searching through a pile of rubbish isn't for everyone, but I absolutely thrive on it. Don't knock it until you've tried it!


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger
Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

You'll find items that are unique and no one else has

There's nothing quite like the satisfaction of someone asking you where you got your new dress from and replying in a smug tone, "Oh it's vintage, darling!", and smirking knowing they'll never find a replica... or maybe that's just me being particularly evil?! 

This is especially the case when shopping vintage and finding more antique style pieces that aren't currently being mass-produced, meaning it's less likely someone else will have an exact replica of it. High street fashion can become a little stale when everyone starts wearing the same pair of studded ankle boots or floral printed dress, but adding a touch of vintage into your wardrobe is actually a little more refreshing despite the garments usually being older than you are! There's also a certain charm about an item of clothing having another life and story before it came into your possession, particularly if its history dates back to another decade. 


Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

Save the planet as well as your wallet

An absolutely horrifying amount of clothing fills up our limited landfills across the globe. According to a study, this year Britons will send up 235 million items of clothing to landfills in one season alone. The rise of 'fast fashion' and cheap high street retailers means consumers are more likely to purchase disposable garments, which are thrown away within a few months filling up the limited and valuable space we have left. Recycling unwanted items by donating them to charity, customising them or mending them can help reduce the amount of unnecessary clothing going towards landfills. By opening up your spending habits to shopping secondhand, you'll naturally be reducing the demand for new goods, which wreak havoc on the environment during mass production.

Purchasing used goods also helps towards saving the excessive energy used and pollution created via transporting brand new goods. Of course, there are still some carbon emissions in the transportation of used items travelling to the charity shop, post office or vintage store, but it's significantly lower than the mass-produced pieces being flown around the world from huge factories. Thrift shopping naturally results in a significantly lower carbon footprint and it's an easy change to make. Another positive point is that by shopping second you'll also saves on packaging waste, which accompanies buying new goods in the form of plastic, tags, cardboard, etc. 

You'll end up with new exciting things that you didn't plan for

When we shop on the high street, we always go out with a rough idea of what we're looking for. However, when shopping secondhand it's mostly a game of chance and seeing what you discover! I personally find this exciting and I've returned home with items I'd never even imagined before but absolutely fell in love with when I saw it in the shop. It's a good way to become a little more adventurous with your style as you can't curate it and plan it as well beforehand, whereas the high street where everywhere usually has roughly the same set of trends during any given time.

However, if you do like the idea of knowing exactly what you want, but still want to save some cash and lower your consumer carbon footprint, then you can use websites such as eBay or Depop to search for specific items for a fraction of the retail price. I use them both religiously to hunt for particular high street goods that have caught my eye. 

Oxfam Festival Shop Bohemian 70s Dress Fashion Blogger

By making a few small changes to your shopping routine here and there will start to make a difference on your personal style, your savings and your impact on the planet. Despite being an advocate for secondhand shopping, I still shop on the high street but it's still significantly less than my shopping amongst vintage and charity shops. Basically you don't have to cut out your trips to your fave high street shop every so often, but by reducing them and replacing them with an secondhand alternative you'll be doing yourself a favour, as well as the environment.


BLOGLOVIN' | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

14 comments

  1. That dress is gorgeous, you have the best style! I love secondhand shopping but don't do it enough. I think the fact that it's more time consuming puts me off but it's actually so much more rewarding!

    Andini xx | Adventures of an Anglophile

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow you look stunning in that dress. I grew up in an environment that's completely different from yours. I had older sisters and hand me down clothing wasn't anything new. Just about everyone I knew did it. However, I never liked it even as a child. I love looking for bargains and sales but I haven't found a love for secondhand clothing.

    www.onthetamarindhill.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. I used to be a secondhand queen, but I've totally lost my mojo in recent years! xx

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love shopping around for a bargain, I get a lot of my homeware from charity shops or centres where you can buy pre-owned stuff. 1/4 of the cost of new and if it isn't from Next I'll be the only person with it.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I will keep this in mind. The orange dress looks lovely on you. R

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love charity shopping, I save so much buying second hand.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I regularly buy second hand clothing from eBay but have to admit I've never really looked in the charity shops. There are a lot of them in my town so I'll have to try it out one day.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great post and love this outfit!

    ReplyDelete
  9. It was the same for me. I grew up in a wealthy area but I was very much poor and had been my whole life. I loved to thrift and when apps like Depop became available it made me so happy. It really does help you save money x

    ReplyDelete
  10. Fantastic post! I love charity shops! Aside from being cheap, and helping a good cause, you can find so many different and unique items you wouldn't find in any high street shops!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Firstly - you look FIERCE! I love your style!!! And secondly - I'm such a secondhand and vintage advocate. I agree - there is nothing so satisfying as finding a hidden gem that few people will have. I found a pair of Bally boots for £15 and I was over the moon at a vintage stall at Reading festival. I like thinking about the environment too - time to renew and reuse for sure!

    Thanks for sharing!

    Leigh at Fashion Du Jour LDN x

    ReplyDelete
  12. You're absolutely right! Even my family has never bought anything second hand, as far as what I can remember when I was young. I myself, prefer not to especially for things that are fabric and ones that can't be washed.

    Really like the photos, you're looking great!

    ReplyDelete
  13. This dress is beautiful and could be sold in high street boutiques nowadays, this totally prouves your point ! ;)
    I love second hand shopping too but I'm waiting for my weight to "stabilize" (well, go down and then stop lol) to shop more because those treasures are ones I want to keep forever and be able to wear them again and again. I love the fact that they're remnants of past fashion trends and are well made and unique !

    http://i-think-its-today.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love love love this outfit! Luckily I live in Brighton so we're spoilt for charity shops! And I got one of my favourite dresses ever for £3 at a car boot sale!

    Beth x
    www.myfunsizedlife.com

    ReplyDelete

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